shoshannah white

some new things to show you....

PUBLIC ART: Fort Kent, Maine

"Developing, 1839" Installed 2013

I’ve recently completed a new project in Powell Hall at the University of Maine, Fort Kent: a three part installation including a motion activated light box and two hand painted wall stencils.

Fort Kent was founded in the same year as photography was invented so I chose to photograph native Maine plant species in nineteenth century photographic processes for this installation. The photographs are based on historical processes with the light box images referencing glass plate collodion processes and the wall paintings referencing cyanotype prints.

The photographs are a collection of images representing native Maine plant species found in the Powell Hall Garden. Included are the following species from left to right: Hophornbeam, Tamarack branch, Cranberry leaf, Tamarack tree, Ash branch, Black Cherry flowers.

"Canopy" Buxton, Maine 2012

PUBLIC ART: Buxton, Maine

Buxton, Maine

"Canopy" 2012

I’m so excited to have completed this work. It was a project that seemed so straightforward but proved to be a bear to produce. It’s installed in the cafeteria of the Buxton Center Elementary School in Maine.

Each piece is double sided, translucent and printed with metallic inks to shimmer and reflect with the changing light. Hung from above, this installation is meant to reference a tree canopy and attempts to create a sense of lightness and reflection within a closed yet expansive space. The panels reflect the widow proportions and are roughly 5’x7’.

Public Art: Orono

Orono, Maine

"Stand of Elms" 2011

I just installed an illuminated, glass Sculpture at the University of Maine, Orono. It’s 4’x4’x5.5’

The photographs wrap around the cube as one continuous landscape and capture a group of American Elm trees in Castine, Maine.

History: The University’s campus mall was at one time lined with American Elm trees - almost all of which suffered the blight of Dutch Elm Disease. Dr. Richard Campana (1918 - 2005, professor emeritus at the University of Maine, Orono) was an expert on Dutch Elm Disease and helped develop/administer a vaccine that saved innumerable American Elm trees including more than 300 in the town of Castine, Maine.




Public Art: Brunswick

"Finding Words" 2011

This summer I installed four photographic murals at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Elementary School in Brunswick, Maine.  The images were captured throughout the Maine seasons. Each piece consists of a photograph combined with a word and together are meant to be open to interpretation. (4’x4’ each)

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Public Art: Gorham

Gorham, Maine

"Maple Leaf" 2011

This summer I installed an eight piece photographic, glass mural in the library at the Great Falls Elementary School, Gorham, Maine. (100 square feet.)

The photographs are a collection of images capturing a maple leaf at a point in its life cycle where the outer epidermis has fallen away leaving only the lacy, cellular structure visible. The subject matter is meant to provide an interior landscape tied to the outside world.

PUBLIC ART: Portland, Maine

Just adding a few pieces of public art from my archive…

"Life Science" 2006

This work is installed on the exterior of the Bioscience Research Facility, located on Falmouth Street at the University of Southern Maine’s Portland campus.

There are three panels at 4’ x 4’ and one grid of four panels measuring at 12’ x 13’

I worked closely with the USM scientists to represent specimens that are studied within the facility and was able to photograph microscopically at both the University as well as at the Maine Medical Center research facility. 

PUBLIC ART: Portland Intermodal

Just adding a few pieces of public art from my archive…

“ Romance of Travel” 2004

This was the first public art project I worked on. It was a collaboration with my partner and fellow photographer, Tonee Harbert.

The installation includes eight double sided glass banners at 15” x 30” and four mounted 4’ x 4’ photographic c-pints.

We traveled around Maine, Massachusetts and New Hampshire photographing all things “travel” and ultimately assembled a collection of imagery both historic and contemporary.